Keynote Speakers

Diane Atkins
Diane AtkinsKeynote: The Evolving Role of Occupational and Physical Therapy in Advanced Upper Limb Amputee Rehabilitation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Baylor College of Medicine Houston, Texas, US

Diane is an internationally recognized occupational therapist specializing in upper limb amputee rehabilitation. She has worked with over 2000 children and adults with amputations and has lectured extensively throughout the US and abroad in areas relating to the evaluation, treatment, training and functional outcomes of individuals with unilateral and bilateral limb loss. She has been a co-investigator in several grants sponsored by the National Institute of Health (NIH), the Veterans Administration and NASA.
In advance of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, Diane was asked by the United States Surgeon General to present several courses for the clinical rehabilitation teams at Walter Reed and Brooke Army Medical Centers regarding the management and care of soldiers who had sustained upper limb loss.
Diane is the co-editor and contributing author of 2 text books relating to the comprehensive management of children and adults with upper extremity amputation and has written several journal articles as well. She is a Fellow in the International Society of Prosthetics and Orthotics (ISPO) and Honorary Member in the American Academy of Orthotics and Prosthetics (AAOP).
Diane is currently pursuing a research project that is comparing the functional and quality of life outcomes of individuals fit with state-of-the-art electric hands and those receiving unilateral and bilateral hand transplants in the United States and Europe. She has presented this topic to international audiences of hand, plastic and vascularized composite allotransplantation(VCA) surgeons.

Rickard Brånemark
Rickard BrånemarkKeynote: Interfacing in the 21st Century
Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, US

Rickard Brånemark was Director of the Center of Orthopaedic Osseointegration at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, between 1999-2014. Performed more than 200 surgeries using a novel percutaneous osseointegrated prosthetic system for the treatment of amputees. Lead surgeon for a team that in 2013 for the first time in the world implanted muscle and nerve electrodes in an amputee with an osseointegrated implant to improve the control of the prosthetic arm. Presently visiting associate professor at the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, and co-director for the international Center for Osseointegration Research, Education and Surgery (iCORES) at University of California, San Francisco.

Paul S. Cederna
Paul S. CedernaKeynote: Implantable Sensors
Chief, Section of Plastic Surgery Robert Oneal Professor of Plastic Surgery Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering University of Michigan, US

President, Plastic Surgery Foundation
Board of Directors, American Board of Plastic Surgery
Past-President, Plastic Surgery Research Council
Past-President, American Soceity for Peripheral Nerve

Paul S. Cederna, M.D. is the Robert Oneal Professor of Plastic Surgery, Chief of the Section of Plastic Surgery, and Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan who specializes in reconstruction of complex wounds. By combining his clinical training in general surgery, microsurgery, and plastic surgery and background in biomedical engineering, he is able to incorporate creative solutions with technically challenging operations to solve the most difficult problems resulting from trauma, cancer, or burns. Academically, Dr. Cederna has a very active research enterprise directing the Neuromuscular Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan. Dr. Cederna has received over $26,000,000 in direct research funding, authored over 180 scientific manuscripts, published 22 book chapters, presented his work over 600 times at national and international meetings, and has been asked to give over 300 extramural presentations. He has received over 65 national research awards. Dr. Cederna has been the Chairman of the Plastic Surgery Research Council, President of the American Society for Peripheral Nerve, President of the Michigan Academy of Plastic Surgeons, and is on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Plastic Surgery. He is currently President for the Plastic Surgery Foundation.

Dario Farina
Dario FarinaKeynote: Multichannel Signal Extraction after TMR
Professor and Chair in Neurorehabilitation Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London, UK

Dario Farina received Ph.D. degrees in automatic control and computer science and in electronics and communications engineering from the Ecole Centrale de Nantes, Nantes, France, and Politecnico di Torino, Italy, in 2001 and 2002, respectively. He is currently Full Professor and Chair in Neurorehabilitation Engineering at the Department of Bioengineering of the Imperial College London, UK. He has previously been Full Professor at Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark, (until 2010) and at the University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University, Germany, where he has been founding Director of the Institute of Neurorehabilitation Systems (2010-2016) and the Chair in Neuroinformatics of the Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen (2010-2015). Among other awards, he has been the recipient of the Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award, of the 2010 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Early Career Achievement Award, in 2012 he has been elected Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), and in 2014-2015 he has been Distinguished Lecturer IEEE. His research focuses on biomedical signal processing, neurorehabilitation technology, and neural control of movement. Within these areas, he has (co)-authored more than 400 papers in peer-reviewed Journals, which have currently received cumulatively more than 19,000 citations, and over 500 among conference papers/abstracts, book chapters, and encyclopaedia contributions. Professor Farina has been the President of the International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK) (2012-2014) and is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the official Journal of this Society, the Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology. He is also currently an Editor for IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering and for the Journal of Physiology, and previously covered editorial roles in several other Journals.

Levi Hargrove
Levi HargroveKeynote: Feedbackdriven Control
Director of the Neural Engineering for Prosthetic and Orthotics Laboratory at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC), US

Levi J. Hargrove, PhD, P.Eng, received his MScE and PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of New Brunswick (2005, 2008).
He is currently the Director of Center for Bionic Medicine at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, formerly the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC), and an Associate Professor in the Departments of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and the McCormick School of Engineering at Northwestern University.

His research interests include signal processing, pattern recognition, and myoelectric control of powered prostheses. A major goal of his research is to develop clinically realizable myoelectric control systems that can be made available to persons with limb loss in the near future.

In 2012, Dr. Hargrove co-founded Coapt, a company to commercialize control algorithms for prosthetics and orthotics. His research addresses all levels of amputation and has been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and the New England Journal of Medicine and has resulted in multiple patents. Key projects include the development of advanced and adaptive control systems for prosthetic legs, improving control of robotic hand prostheses, and intramuscular EMG signal processing.

Hugh Herr
Hugh HerrKeynote: On Prosthetic Control: An Agonist-antagonist Myoneural Interface
Associate Professor, Media Arts and Sciences Associate Professor, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology Hugh Herr directs the Biomechatronics group at The MIT Media Lab,US

Hugh Herr is creating bionic limbs that emulate the function of natural limbs. Time Magazine coined Dr. Herr the ‘Leader of the Bionic Age’ because of his revolutionary work in the emerging field of Biomechatronics – technology that marries human physiology with electromechanics. A double amputee himself, he is responsible for breakthrough advances in bionic limbs that provide greater mobility and new hope to those with physical disabilities. He is currently Professor of Media Arts and Sciences at the MIT Media Lab, and co-director of the MIT Center for Extreme Bionics.
Herr is the author and co-author of over 150 peer-reviewed manuscripts and patents, chronicling the science and technology behind his many innovations. These innovations include Computer-Controlled Artificial Knees, Active Leg Exoskeletons and Powered Ankle-Foot Prostheses. A computer-controlled knee prosthesis called the Rheo, which is outfitted with a microprocessor that continually senses the joint’s position and the loads applied to the limb, was named to the list of Top Ten Inventions in the health category by TIME magazine in 2004. A powered ankle-foot prosthesis called EmPower, which emulates the action of biological leg and, for the first time, provides amputees with a natural gait, was named to the same TIME top-ten list in 2007. He is the Founder of BionX Inc., a company that commercializes the EmPower Ankle-Foot Prosthesis, fist in a series of products that will emulate physiological function through electromechanical replacement. Today the EmPower Ankle- Foot Prosthesis has been clinically shown to be the first leg prosthesis in history to reach human normalization, allowing amputees to walk with normal levels of speed and metabolism as if their legs were biological once again. Herr has received many accolades for his groundbreaking innovations, including the 13th Annual Heinz Award for Technology, the Economy and Employment; the Prince Salman Award for Disability Research; the Smithsonian American Ingenuity Award in Technology, the 14th Innovator of the Year Award, and the 41st Inventor of the Year Award, ant the 2016 Princess of Asturias Award for Technical & Scientific Research. Hugh’s story has been told in a National Geographic film, Ascent: The Story of Hugh Herr, and episodes and articles featured in CNN, The Economist, Discover and Nature.

Peter Kyberd
Peter KyberdKeynote: Outcome Research
Head of Department, Professor of Rehabilitation Cybernetics, Department of Engineering Science, Faculty of Engineering & Science, University of Greenwich, UK

Peter J. Kyberd received his Ph.D. from Southampton University, Southampton, U.K. It studied the control of a multifunction prosthetic hand, and included creating the first microprocessor controlled prosthetic hand to be worn by a user in the field.

Throughout the 1990s, he worked at the Oxford Orthopaedic Engineering Centre, (Oxford University) where he was involved in a verity of orthopaedic projects including two projects funded by the European Union investigating aspects of the design and control of prosthetic arms. The team fitted the first prosthetic limb to be controlled by a serial bus and used in the field in 1998, the successor to arm continues to be in use. From 2000, he was a Lecturer at the Cybernetics Department of Reading University in the U.K. where he was part of a team that performed the first implant of a bi-directional nerve sensor on a healthy human being.

In 2003, he took up a Canada Research Chair in Rehabilitation Cybernetics at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, where he conducted research in the clinical application of intelligent prosthetic arms and was part of the Upper Limb Prosthetics Outcome Measures Group, promoting the use of validated and standardised tools of prosthetic assessment. In 2015 he became the Head of the Engineering Science Department of the University of Greenwich in the UK.

Dustin Tyler
Dustin TylerKeynote: Sensory Feedback
Kent H. Smith Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, US

Associate Director, Advanced Platform Technology Center (APT), Louis Stokes Cleveland Dept Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Dustin J. Tyler, Ph.D. is the Kent H. Smith Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH. He has a secondary appointment as a principal investigator at the Louis-Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center (LSCDVAMC) and is the Associate Director of the Advanced Platform for Technology Center, a Department of Veteran’s Affairs Rehabilitation Research & Development National Center. Dr. Tyler has over 25 years of experience advancing neuromodulation technology with extensive publications, patents, and popular media coverage of his work. He holds the Kent H. Smith endowed professorship at Case Western Reserve University and has a prestigious Research Career Scientist award from the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development service. Dr. Tyler has previously held the Nord Distinguished Assistant Professorship and the Elmer Lincoln Lindseth Associate Professorships at Case Western Reserve University. In 2017 he was inducted into the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) – an invited membership representing the top 2% of engineers in the field. Dr. Tyler was awarded the Neurotechnology Researcher of the Year award in 2015. He has had more than $26M in funding from the VA, NIH, NSF, and DARPA and more than 16 active US and international patents. He has published in Science, Nature:Nanotechnology, Science Translational Medicine, and many other discipline specific journals. Dr. Tyler’s expertise and interests include feasibility clinical trials of Class III medical devices with emphasis on neural interfaces for prosthetic systems; acute and chronic pre-clinical studies in small and large mammalian models, and computational neuroscience. His research activity ranges from early technology innovation to clinical implementation of neural interface devices and systems; application of neural interfaces for restoration of natural sensation and control in limb loss; neuromimetic devices and materials; MEMS technology applied to development of advanced neural devices; neuromodulation system development; computational neural modeling; neural prostheses for restoration of lost function in physically intact, but neurologically impaired individuals; and neural prostheses for head and neck applications. Prior to his academic research career, Dr. Tyler spent several years in the commercial sector commercializing neural prosthesis for restoration of function in spinal cord injured and stroke patients. He led research and development efforts for neuromodulation of patients with dysphagia, as well as, managing the development of clinical programming software for Class III medical devices.

Workshop speakers

Dario Farina
Dario FarinaProfessor and Chair in Neurorehabilitation Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London, UK
Dario Farina received Ph.D. degrees in automatic control and computer science and in electronics and communications engineering from the Ecole Centrale de Nantes, Nantes, France, and Politecnico di Torino, Italy, in 2001 and 2002, respectively. He is currently Full Professor and Chair in Neurorehabilitation Engineering at the Department of Bioengineering of the Imperial College London, UK. He has previously been Full Professor at Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark, (until 2010) and at the University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University, Germany, where he has been founding Director of the Institute of Neurorehabilitation Systems (2010-2016) and the Chair in Neuroinformatics of the Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen (2010-2015). Among other awards, he has been the recipient of the Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award, of the 2010 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Early Career Achievement Award, in 2012 he has been elected Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), and in 2014-2015 he has been Distinguished Lecturer IEEE. His research focuses on biomedical signal processing, neurorehabilitation technology, and neural control of movement. Within these areas, he has (co)-authored more than 400 papers in peer-reviewed Journals, which have currently received cumulatively more than 19,000 citations, and over 500 among conference papers/abstracts, book chapters, and encyclopaedia contributions. Professor Farina has been the President of the International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK) (2012-2014) and is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the official Journal of this Society, the Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology. He is also currently an Editor for IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering and for the Journal of Physiology, and previously covered editorial roles in several other Journals.
Todd Kuiken
Todd KuikenDirector, Center for Bionic Medicine (CBM)
Dr. Todd A. Kuiken, MD, PhD received a B.S. degree in biomedical engineering from Duke University (1983), a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois (1989), and his M.D. from Northwestern University Medical School (1990).
At the Center for Bionic Medicine (CBM), Dr. Kuiken leads a multidisciplinary team of prosthetists, therapists, neuroscientists, engineers, software developers, graduate students, and post-doctoral researchers. The goal of CBM is to improve the function and quality of life for individuals with limb loss and other physical disabilities. This combination of clinical and research expertise provides a unique environment to translate research data into clinical applications. In addition to his work at CBM, Dr. Kuiken is a Professor in the Departments of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Biomedical Engineering, and Surgery at Northwestern University.

The primary focus of Dr. Kuiken’s research has been to develop a neural-machine interface to improve the function of artificial limbs. He is best known for his research in developing a surgical technique called Targeted Muscle Reinnervation (TMR), which is now a standard procedure and has been performed in hospitals worldwide.

Janne Hahne
Janne HahneDepartment of Trauma Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery and Hand Surgery of the University Medical Center Göttingen, Germany
Dr. Janne Hahne is a postdoctoral research scientist at the Neurorehabilitation Systems Research Group at the Department of Trauma Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery and Hand Surgery of the University Medical Center Göttingen, Germany. His main research interests include simultaneous and proportional myoelectric control, co-adaptive human-machine learning, adaptive signal processing, closed-loop prosthesis control, bio-signal interfaces and machine learning.
Dr. Hahne graduated in Electical Engineering and was from 2009 to 2010 with the strategic technology management at Otto Bock HC, Duderstadt, Germany. He then joined the Machine Learning Group at TU-Berlin, where he did a PhD in Machine Learning with a focus on advanced prosthesis control. Since 2014 he is with the University Medical Center Göttingen where he has been involved in several national and international research projects on myoelectric control.
Alexander Schulz
Alexander SchulzFaculty of Technology / AG Machine Learning, University of Bielefeld
Alexander Schulz defended his PhD. thesis with the title Discriminative Dimensionality Reduction: Variations, Applications, Interpretations at CITEC, Bielefeld University in early 2017. Currently, he is working on the CITEC research project Towards Cognitive Control: Transfer Learning for Robust Steering of Myoelectric Devices in collaboration with the CD Laboratory for Restoration of Extremity Function from the Medical University of Vienna.
Paul S. Cederna
Paul S. CedernaChief, Section of Plastic Surgery Robert Oneal Professor of Plastic Surgery Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering University of Michigan
President, Plastic Surgery Foundation
Board of Directors, American Board of Plastic Surgery
Past-President, Plastic Surgery Research Council
Past-President, American Soceity for Peripheral Nerve

Paul S. Cederna, M.D. is the Robert Oneal Professor of Plastic Surgery, Chief of the Section of Plastic Surgery, and Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan who specializes in reconstruction of complex wounds. By combining his clinical training in general surgery, microsurgery, and plastic surgery and background in biomedical engineering, he is able to incorporate creative solutions with technically challenging operations to solve the most difficult problems resulting from trauma, cancer, or burns. Academically, Dr. Cederna has a very active research enterprise directing the Neuromuscular Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan. Dr. Cederna has received over $26,000,000 in direct research funding, authored over 180 scientific manuscripts, published 22 book chapters, presented his work over 600 times at national and international meetings, and has been asked to give over 300 extramural presentations. He has received over 65 national research awards. Dr. Cederna has been the Chairman of the Plastic Surgery Research Council, President of the American Society for Peripheral Nerve, President of the Michigan Academy of Plastic Surgeons, and is on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Plastic Surgery. He is currently President for the Plastic Surgery Foundation.

Max Ortiz Catalán
Max Ortiz CatalánBiomechatronics and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology.
Dr. Max Ortiz Catalán, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, where he founded and currently heads the Biomechatronics and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory (@ChalmersBNL). Dr. Ortiz Catalán works in close collaboration with the Centre for Advanced Reconstruction of Extremities at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, and serves as a Research Director of Integrum AB, both in Sweden. His research includes bioelectric signals acquisition electronics (analog and digital); bioelectric signal processing and machine learning algorithms for decoding motor volition and control; implanted and non-invasive neuromuscular interfaces; bone-anchored prostheses and osseointegration; and, virtual and augmented reality for neuromuscular rehabilitation and the treatment of phantom limb pain. Dr. Ortiz Catalán won the “European Youth Award” by the European Council in 2014, the “Delsys Prize” by Delsys in 2016, and was part of the wining team of the “Brian & Joyce Blatchford Award” by ISPO in 2017.
Rickard Brånemark
Rickard BrånemarkOrthopaedic Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, US
Director of the Center of Orthopaedic Osseointegration at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, between 1999-2014. Performed more than 200 surgeries using a novel percutaneous osseointegrated prosthetic system for the treatment of amputees. Lead surgeon for a team that in 2013 for the first time in the world implanted muscle and nerve electrodes in an amputee with an osseointegrated implant to improve the control of the prosthetic arm. Presently visiting associate professor at the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, and co-director for the international Center for Osseointegration Research, Education and Surgery (iCORES) at University of California, San Francisco.
Stefan Salminger
Stefan SalmingerDepartment for Surgery, Division of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Medical University of Vienna
Stefan Salminger joined the research group of Professor Aszmann in 2012. His research interests in the Christian Doppler Laboratory focus on the clinical and functional outcome of bionic reconstruction, from surgery to the final prosthetic fitting. Currently he is a resident at the Department for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Medical University of Vienna.
Oskar Aszmann
Oskar AszmannAssociate Professor, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (Department of Surgery)
Prof. Oskar C. Aszmann, born in Vienna, Austria. After a two year excursion into philosophy and biology Dr. Aszmann finished Medical School at the medical faculty of the University of Vienna (1994). He then went on to the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland where he learned the trade of peripheral nerve surgery from Prof. Lee Dellon and the basic science of peripheral nerve regeneration from Prof. Thomas Brushart. In 1998 he joined the Division of Plastic Surgery in Vienna where he finished his training in 2004 and was promoted the position of Associate Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Since 2006 he has entered a close collaboration with the company Otto Bock to explore the possibilities and limits of bionic reconstruction which has led to the establishment of a partly private/government funded Center for Extremity Reconstruction and Rehabilitation in 2012. This Center is being headed by Prof. Aszmann and has at its core interest the reconstruction and rehabilitation of patients with impaired extremity function. This goal is accomplished with a wide variety of surgical techniques of neuromuscular reconstruction alone or in combination with complex mechatronic devices.
His research focuses on all aspects of reconstructive surgery, both from a clinical but also from a basic research perspective. This has precipitated in different textbook chapters and is being published both in top journals of his field but also larger audience periodicals such as The Lancet and Science Translational Medicine and various Nature Group Periodicals. For his recent accomplishments in this field and his care for patients with complex extremity injuries he was awarded by the Royal Society of Medicine, London twice and received the Hans Anderl Award- the most prestigious research prize awarded by the European Association for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He serves in the board of directors of several national und international scientific societies and is in the editorial board of several international Journals.
He has received research grants of the Austrian Research Agency (FWF) and the Christian Doppler Research Foundation with a sum total of about 4,2 Mio€ and has most recently received the prestigious Houska Award for excellency in public-private partnership.
Cynthia A. Chestek
Cynthia A. ChestekDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan
Cynthia A. Chestek received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 2005 and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2010. From 2010 to 2012, she was a Research Associate at the Stanford Department of Neurosurgery with the Braingate 2 clinical trial. In 2012 she became an assistant professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, where she runs the Cortical Neural Prosthetics Lab. She is the author of 32 full-length scientific articles. Her research interests include high-density interfaces to the nervous system for the control of multiple degree of freedom hand and finger movements.
Cosima Prahm
Cosima PrahmDepartment of Surgery, Division for Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Medical University of Vienna
Before joining the CD Laboratory in 2013, Cosima Prahm’s research interests focused on diagnostic imaging such as fMRI and EEG within the field of neurodegenerative diseases. The main research topics at the CD Laboratory for Extremity Restoration are associated with Biomedical Engineering and Medical Informatics – human computer interfaces, virtual and augmented reality, game design and rehabilitation systems.

Ongoing projects involve the evaluation of pattern recognition algorithms compared to conventional control and game-based virtual rehabilitation.

Agnes Sturma
Agnes SturmaDepartment for Surgery, Division of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Medical University of Vienna
Agnes Sturma (MSc BSc), has been working at the Christian Doppler Laboratory for Restoration of Extremity Function since 2012. As a physiotherapist she is involved in the rehabilitation of patients with amputations or loss of function of their extremities. Together with other experts she has developed a structured rehabilitation protocol for amputees with selective nerve transfers. In her PhD Agnes Sturma focuses on possible treatment methods for amputees with phantom limb pain. The influence of selective nerve transfers, training, prosthetic fitting and prosthetic function is investigated in these patients.

Responsible Persons for the Live Surgery Broadcast

Reinhard Windhager
Reinhard WindhagerProf. and Chair, University Clinic of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Clinical Dept. of Orthopaedics Vienna General Hospital/Medical University of Vienna
Reinhard Windhager, MD, born 13th September, 1957 in Linz is an Austrian orthopaedic surgeon, who specialises in orthopaedic oncology and adult reconstruction

Reinhard Windhager graduated in 1981 at the University of Innsbruck. After training at the General Hospital in Linz and at the University Clinic for Orthopaedic Surgery in Vienna he became a medical specialist in orthopaedics in 1988. Between 1988 and 1997 Reinhard Windhager worked at the University Clinic of Orthopaedics in Vienna, the Children’s Clinic in Glanzing and the St. Anna Children’s Hospital in various orthopaedic focal points.
In 1995 Reinhard Windhager qualified as professor in orthopaedics and orthopaedic surgery and in 1997 was appointed full professor of orthopaedics and Head of the Department of Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery at the Karl-Franzens University in Graz and built this up to the University Clinic of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Medical University of Graz in 2001 and was appointed its Head. In 2010 he was appointed Head of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna.
In 2002 and 2003 Reinhard Windhager was President of the Austrian Society for Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery (ÖGO) and in the two following years he was the Vice President. In 2006 Reinhard Windhager was President of the Central European Orthopaedic Congress. Besides memberships in numerous national and international societies Reinhard Windhager was on the Board of the Doctors Society in Vienna and from 2014 – 2015 he served as President of ISOLS (International Society of Limb Salvage).

Univ. Prof. Dr. Reinhard Windhager
Prof. and Chair, University Clinic of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, Clinical Dept. of Orthopaedics
Vienna General Hospital/Medical University of Vienna
Waehringer Guertel 18-20
A-1090 Vienna, Austria

Oskar Aszmann
Oskar AszmannAssociate Professor, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (Department of Surgery)
Prof. Oskar C. Aszmann, born in Vienna, Austria. After a two year excursion into philosophy and biology Dr. Aszmann finished Medical School at the medical faculty of the University of Vienna (1994). He then went on to the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland where he learned the trade of peripheral nerve surgery from Prof. Lee Dellon and the basic science of peripheral nerve regeneration from Prof. Thomas Brushart. In 1998 he joined the Division of Plastic Surgery in Vienna where he finished his training in 2004 and was promoted the position of Associate Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Since 2006 he has entered a close collaboration with the company Otto Bock to explore the possibilities and limits of bionic reconstruction which has led to the establishment of a partly private/government funded Center for Extremity Reconstruction and Rehabilitation in 2012. This Center is being headed by Prof. Aszmann and has at its core interest the reconstruction and rehabilitation of patients with impaired extremity function. This goal is accomplished with a wide variety of surgical techniques of neuromuscular reconstruction alone or in combination with complex mechatronic devices.
His research focuses on all aspects of reconstructive surgery, both from a clinical but also from a basic research perspective. This has precipitated in different textbook chapters and is being published both in top journals of his field but also larger audience periodicals such as The Lancet and Science Translational Medicine and various Nature Group Periodicals. For his recent accomplishments in this field and his care for patients with complex extremity injuries he was awarded by the Royal Society of Medicine, London twice and received the Hans Anderl Award- the most prestigious research prize awarded by the European Association for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He serves in the board of directors of several national und international scientific societies and is in the editorial board of several international Journals.
He has received research grants of the Austrian Research Agency (FWF) and the Christian Doppler Research Foundation with a sum total of about 4,2 Mio€ and has most recently received the prestigious Houska Award for excellency in public-private partnership.
Rickard Brånemark
Rickard BrånemarkOrthopaedic Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, US
Director of the Center of Orthopaedic Osseointegration at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, between 1999-2014. Performed more than 200 surgeries using a novel percutaneous osseointegrated prosthetic system for the treatment of amputees. Lead surgeon for a team that in 2013 for the first time in the world implanted muscle and nerve electrodes in an amputee with an osseointegrated implant to improve the control of the prosthetic arm. Presently visiting associate professor at the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, and co-director for the international Center for Osseointegration Research, Education and Surgery (iCORES) at University of California, San Francisco.